COMVAC INJECTION 5ML

Out of stock
SKU
COM0185
₹600.00 Inclusive of all taxes
Manufacturer : ADO-ADINOS
Composition : HAEMOPHILUS B CONJUGATE VACCINE-10MCG+DIPHTHERIA TOXOID-30I.U+TETANUS TOXOID-60I.U+HEPATITIS B IMMUNOGLOBULIN-10MCG+PERTUSSIS IMMUNOGLOBULIN-4I.U
Dose Form : INJECTION
Description : COMVAC 5 INJ
Route Of Administration : PARENTERAL
Pack : 1

Drug Ingredient Information

HAEMOPHILUS B CONJUGATE VACCINE-10MCG+DIPHTHERIA TOXOID-30I.U+TETANUS TOXOID-60I.U+HEPATITIS B IMMUNOGLOBULIN-10MCG+PERTUSSIS IMMUNOGLOBULIN-4I.U

HAEMOPHILUS B CONJUGATE VACCINE

Information for patients
Drug Information Haemophilus B is a type of influenza (flu) caused by bacteria. Haemophilus B bacteria can infect the lungs or throat, and can also spread to the blood, bones, joints, brain, or spinal cord. It can cause breathing problems or meningitis, and these infections can be fatal. Haemophilus B disease can spread from one person to another through small droplets of saliva that are expelled into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The bacteria can also be passed through contact with objects the infected person has touched, such as a door handle, or other surface. The bacteria can also be passed through kissing, or sharing a drinking glass or eating utensil with an infected person. Haemophilus B conjugate vaccine is used to prevent infection caused by haemophilus B bacteria, and is sometimes combined with vaccines to protect against other diseases. Haemophilus B vaccine will not protect against other types of influenza. Haemophilus B conjugate vaccine works by exposing your child to a small dose of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body. Haemophilus B conjugate vaccine is for use in children between the ages of 2 months and 4 years old. Like any vaccine, haemophilus B conjugate vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person.
Drug Alert
Alert no data available
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug The haemophilus B conjugate vaccine is given in a series of shots. In most cases, this vaccine is given as 2 separate shots, 2 months apart. A booster dose is then given 2 months after the last shot, or no later than 18 months of age. Your child's individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by the health department of the state you live in. Be sure your child receives all recommended doses of this vaccine. If your child does not receive the full series of vaccines, he or she may not be fully protected against the disease. Your child can still receive a vaccine if he or she has a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until the child gets better before receiving this vaccine. Your child should not receive a booster vaccine if he or she had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot. Keep track of any and all side effects your child has after receiving this vaccine. When the child receives a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shots caused any side effects. Becoming infected with haemophilus B is much more dangerous to your child's health than receiving the vaccine to protect against it. Like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects, but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.
Drug Special Care Your child should not receive this vaccine if he or she has ever had an allergic reaction to a haemophilus B or a tetanus vaccine, or if the child has received cancer chemotherapy or radiation treatment in the past 3 months. Before receiving haemophilus B conjugate vaccine, tell your child's doctor if the child is allergic to any drugs, or has: a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia or easy bruising; a history of seizures; a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain (or if this was a reaction to a previous vaccine); an allergy to latex rubber; a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments; or if the child is taking a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this vaccine is harmful to an unborn baby. Before you receive the vaccine, tell your doctor if you are pregnant. Haemophilus B conjugate vaccine should not be given to a woman who is breast-feeding a baby.
Drug Drug Interactions Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all other vaccines your child has recently received. Also tell the doctor if your child has recently received drugs or treatments that can weaken the immune system, including: an oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroid medicine; medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders, such as azathioprine (Imuran), efalizumab (Raptiva), etanercept (Enbrel), leflunomide (Arava), and others; or medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, such as basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf), muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with haemophilus B conjugate vaccine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications your child uses. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your child's doctor.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this vaccine is harmful to an unborn baby. Before you receive the vaccine, tell your doctor if you are pregnant.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction Haemophilus B conjugate vaccine should not be given to a woman who is breast-feeding a baby.
Drug Machinery Interaction no data available
Drug More Information Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info no data available
Drug quanitty nfants and children 2 through 18 months of age: Using saline diluent (0.4% Sodium Chloride) cleanse the vaccine vial rubber stopper with a suitable germicide and inject the entire volume of diluent contained in the vial or syringe into the vial of lyophilized vaccine. Thorough agitation is advised to ensure complete reconstitution. The entire volume of reconstituted vaccine is then drawn back into the syringe before injecting one 0.5 mL dose intramuscularly. or Using Sanofi Pasteur diphtheria/ pertussis, whole cell/ tetanus (DTP), cleanse both the DTP and haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (PRP-T) vaccine vial rubber stoppers with a suitable germicide prior to reconstitution. Thoroughly agitate the vial of Sanofi Pasteur DTP then withdraw a 0.6 mL dose and inject into the vial of lyophilized haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (PRP-T) vaccine. After reconstitution and thorough agitation, the combined vaccines will appear whitish in color. Withdraw and administer 0.5 mL dose of the combined vaccines intramuscularly. Vaccine should be used within 24 hours after reconstitution. Children 15 to 18 months of age: Using Sanofi Pasteur diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis, acel vaccine (Tripedia) vaccine and haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (PRP-T) vaccine vial rubber stoppers with a suitable germicide prior to reconstitution. Thoroughly agitate the vial of Sanofi Pasteur diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis, acel vaccine (Tripedia) then withdraw a 0.6 mL dose and inject into the vial of lyophilized haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (PRP-T) vaccine. After reconstitution and thorough agitation, the combined vaccines will appear whitish in color. Withdraw and administer 0.5 mL dose of the combined vaccines intramuscularly. Vaccine should be used immediately (within 30 minutes) after reconstitution.
Drug Dose This vaccine is given as an injection (shot) into a muscle. Your child will receive this injection in a doctor's office or other clinic setting. Haemophilus B conjugate vaccine is given to children between the ages of 2 months and 18 months old. It may also be given to an older child with a medical conditions such as HIV or AIDS, sickle cell disease, or who is receiving cancer treatments or a bone marrow transfusion. The haemophilus B conjugate vaccine is given in a series of shots. In most cases, this vaccine is given as 2 separate shots, 2 months apart. A booster dose is then given 2 months after the last shot, or no later than 4 years of age. Your child's individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by the health department of the state you live in. Your child can still receive a vaccine if he or she has a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until the child gets better before receiving this vaccine. Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the shot is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to give your child. It is especially important to prevent fever from occurring in a child who has a seizure disorder such as epilepsy.
Excess Drug Consumption An overdose of this vaccine is not likely to occur.
Forgot Drug Consumption Contact your doctor if you will miss a booster dose or if you get behind schedule. The next dose should be given as soon as possible. There is no need to start over. Be sure your child receives all recommended doses of this vaccine. If your child does not receive the full series of vaccines, he or she may not be fully protected against the disease.
Stop Drug Consumption Do not stop the drug untill your doctor says you to do so.
Possible Side Effects
General Information no data available
Common Drug Side Effects Keep track of any and all side effects your child has after receiving this vaccine. When the child receives another haemophilus B vaccine in the future, you will need to tell the child's doctor if the first shot caused any side effects. Becoming infected with haemophilus B is much more dangerous to your child's health than receiving the vaccine to protect against it. Like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects, but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low. Get emergency medical help if your child has any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if your child has any of these serious side effects: extreme drowsiness, fainting; fussiness, irritability, crying for an hour or longer; seizure (black-out or convulsions); or high fever (within a few hours or a few days after the vaccine). Less serious side effects may include: redness, pain, swelling, or a lump where the shot was given; low fever; mild fussiness or crying; joint pain, body aches; drowsiness; or diarrhea. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.
Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Very Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Drug Side Effects Symptoms no data available
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Store in cool place

DIPHTHERIA TOXOID

Information for patients
Drug Information
Drug Alert
Alert
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug
Drug Special Care
Drug Drug Interactions
Drug Pregnancy Interaction
Drug Breast feeding Interaction
Drug Machinery Interaction
Drug More Information
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info
Drug quanitty
Drug Dose
Excess Drug Consumption
Forgot Drug Consumption
Stop Drug Consumption
Possible Side Effects
General Information
Common Drug Side Effects
Rare Drug Side Effects
Very Rare Drug Side Effects
Drug Side Effects Symptoms
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine

TETANUS TOXOID

Information for patients
Drug Information This medication is given to provide protection (immunity) against tetanus (lockjaw) in adults and children 7 years or older. Vaccination is the best way to protect against this life-threatening disease. Vaccines work by causing the body to produce its own protection (antibodies). Tetanus vaccine is usually first given to infants with 2 other vaccines for diphtheria and whooping cough (pertussis) in a series of 3 injections. This medication is usually used as a "booster" vaccine after this first series. Closely follow the vaccination schedule provided by the doctor. Booster injections may be needed at the time of injury in older children and adults if it has been 5-10 years since the last tetanus vaccine was received. Booster injections should also be given every 10 years even if no injury has occurred. This injection or an injection with tetanus/diphtheria or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis may be used for the booster.
Drug Alert
Alert no data available
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug Before you or your child receives this vaccination, tell the doctor or pharmacist if you or your child is allergic to it; or to any other vaccines; or if you or your child has any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients (such as latex), which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.
Drug Special Care This medication should not be used if you or your child has certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult the doctor or pharmacist if you or your child has: history of severe reaction to vaccine (e.g., paralysis, encephalopathy). Before using this medication, tell the doctor or pharmacist your or your child's medical history, especially of: bleeding disorders (e.g., hemophilia, low platelets), history of Guillain-Barre syndrome, high fever (higher than 103 degrees F/39 degrees C) after previous vaccination, other reaction (e.g., swelling, itching at injection site) after previous vaccination, immune system disorders (e.g., autoimmune disorders, radiation treatment), illness/infection, seizures, other nervous system disorders (e.g., paralysis, numbness/tingling, extreme drowsiness, confusion). This medication may contain mercury (in the preservative thimerosal) and should not be used in children younger than 7 years.
Drug Drug Interactions Your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you or your child for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with the doctor or pharmacist first. Before you or your child receives this vaccine, tell the doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you or your child may use, especially of: "blood thinners" (e.g., warfarin), corticosteroids (e.g., hydrocortisone, prednisone), cancer chemotherapy, drugs that weaken the immune system (e.g., cyclosporine, efalizumab, tacrolimus), other recent/planned vaccinations (e.g., diphtheria/tetanus toxoids). This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction It is not known whether this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.
Drug Machinery Interaction no data available
Drug More Information no data available
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info There are various combinations of vaccines available. Based on you or your child's age, medical condition, and any previous reactions to vaccines, the health care professional will decide which vaccine to use. Discuss the risks and benefits of vaccination with the health care provider. History of infection with tetanus does not protect against future infections with this bacteria. You or your child should still receive this vaccine if the doctor orders it.
Drug quanitty no data available
Drug Dose Read the Vaccine Information Statement available from your health care provider before receiving the vaccine. If you have any questions, consult your health care provider. This medication is given by injection into a muscle by a health care professional, usually into the upper arm or upper thigh. This medication should not be given to people who currently have an infection/illness. If possible, schedule the vaccination later after the illness is over.
Excess Drug Consumption If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US National Poison Hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.
Forgot Drug Consumption It is important to receive each vaccination as scheduled. Be sure to make a note of when the vaccination was last given for your/your child's medical record.
Stop Drug Consumption Do not stop the drug untill your doctor says you to do so.
Possible Side Effects
General Information tingling of the hands/feet, hearing problems, trouble swallowing, muscle weakness, seizures.
Common Drug Side Effects Mild fever, joint pain, muscle aches, nausea, tiredness, or pain/itching/swelling/redness at the injection site may occur. Acetaminophen may be used to reduce these effects. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell the doctor or pharmacist promptly.
Rare Drug Side Effects rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.
Very Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Drug Side Effects Symptoms no data available
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Not applicable. This vaccine is given in a doctor's office or clinic and will not be stored at home.

HEPATITIS B IMMUNOGLOBULIN

Information for patients
Drug Information This product is a solution containing a large quantity of hepatitis B antibodies. It is prepared from blood plasma from screened donors. Human Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin is given by injection into a muscle (intramuscular) such as the buttock or thigh. Your doctor or nurse will give you the injection. It is used to protect against infection by the hepatitis B virus and is normally given with hepatitis B vaccine. Your doctor will explain further why this medicine has been given to you. This product is usually given to you if: •you have not had previous vaccination, or have not been properly vaccinated, to hepatitis B and have been accidentally exposed to infection by skin pricks, cuts, spillage into the eye or mouth, from infectious material such as blood, or from bites. •you are having kidney dialysis while waiting for vaccination to be fully effective. •you have not responded to hepatitis B vaccination, but you remain at risk of infection, perhaps because of your job. • you are within seven days of sexual contact with someone who has hepatitis B. The product can also be given to newborn babies whose mother has hepatitis B.
Drug Alert
Alert no data available
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug •suffering from any blood disorders which interfere with clotting •alergic to any of the ingredients in this product.
Drug Special Care •develop an allergic reaction. If you suffer from any of these, or just feel unwell, tell your doctor. •suffer from a blood disorder. Inform your doctor before this medicine is injected. Your doctor or nurse may inject this product just under the skin under these circumstances. •have had any vaccinations recently or know you are about to have any vaccinations. Tell your doctor if this is the case. •have had this product recently as it may give misleading results if you have a blood test. Tell your doctor if this is the case.
Drug Drug Interactions Please tell your doctor if you are taking, or have recently taken, any other medicines, including those obtained without a prescription. This solution for injection must not be mixed with other medicinal products for injection. Your doctor will advise you about any vaccinations you may need in addition to giving you this product.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are breast-feeding before this medicine is injected.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are breast-feeding before this medicine is injected.
Drug Machinery Interaction There are no known effects of this product on your ability to drive or operate machinery.
Drug More Information no data available
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info no data available
Drug quanitty Doses After accidental exposure to possible hepatitis B infection: Adults: The dose is at least 500 IU. Children: 10 years and older: 500 IU (as adult); 5 to 9 years: 300 IU; Birth to 4 years: 200 IU. A second dose is usually given 4 weeks later. Your doctor will advise you on the dose for you and whether you need a second dose. On kidney dialysis a dose of 8 to 12 IU/kg body weight (maximum 500 IU) is given every 2 months while waiting for vaccination to become fully effective. Newborns whose mother has hepatitis B a dose of 30 to 100 IU/kg is given, preferably within 24 hours of birth. Further doses may be necessary until vaccination has become fully effective. Within one week of sexual contact with a person with hepatitis B, the dose is at least 500 IU.
Drug Dose This product must always be injected by a doctor or nurse. Human Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin must never be injected into a vein; it must be injected slowly into a large muscle such as the buttock or thigh. Human Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin does not work if you already have hepatitis B. A blood test to see whether you have the infection may be done before injection. However, the injection should not be delayed for more than 48 hours after you have been exposed to a possible hepatitis B infection. In any case, the dose should be given within one week after exposure to the infection.
Excess Drug Consumption Dail 1066. OR Contact doctor immediately
Forgot Drug Consumption Contact Your doctor
Stop Drug Consumption no data available
Possible Side Effects
General Information Please note The possibility of infection from using medicines made from human blood plasma cannot be totally ruled out. This warning includes known, unknown and new viruses as well as some other germs. Several different steps have been taken to make this possibility very unlikely. These include the careful selection of donors and testing of the plasma they provide for specific types of infection. Furthermore, the method used to produce the medicine from their blood plasma includes steps to kill or remove viruses like HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Immunoglobulins have not been associated with hepatitis A or parvovirus B19 infections possibly because the antibodies against these infections, which are contained in the product, are protective. It is strongly recommended that every time you receive a dose of Human Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin the name and batch number of the product are recorded in order to maintain a record of the batches used. Please remember Since hepatitis B can kill you the expected benefits of your medicine will usually be greater than the risks of suffering any harmful side effects.
Common Drug Side Effects chest pain, shortness of breath, shaking, dizziness, swelling of the face, coating of the tongue, mouth ulcers, joint pains, slight fever.
Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Very Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Drug Side Effects Symptoms no data available
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine •Keep out of the reach and sight of children. •You should store the medicine in its carton to protect it from light, in the refrigerator (2-8°C). Do not freeze. Short periods (up to one week) of storage at room temperature (25°C), in the dark, will not damage the product. •Do not use the medicine after the expiry date which is printed as “EXP” on the containers (the expiry date refers to the last day of the month stated). •Do not use the medicine if it is cloudy or any small bits can be seen in it. Disposal After injection of the correct dose, your doctor or nurse will dispose of any solution that remains, along with used syringes, needles and containers. Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste.

PERTUSSIS IMMUNOGLOBULIN

Information for patients
Drug Information
Drug Alert
Alert
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug
Drug Special Care
Drug Drug Interactions
Drug Pregnancy Interaction
Drug Breast feeding Interaction
Drug Machinery Interaction
Drug More Information
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info
Drug quanitty
Drug Dose
Excess Drug Consumption
Forgot Drug Consumption
Stop Drug Consumption
Possible Side Effects
General Information
Common Drug Side Effects
Rare Drug Side Effects
Very Rare Drug Side Effects
Drug Side Effects Symptoms
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine

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