FERANID TABLET

₹62.40
Out of stock
SKU
FER0228
 
Manufacturer : ODI-ODIN HEALTH CARE
Composition : SODIUM FEREDETATE-700MG+FOLIC ACID-1.5MG+METHYLCOBALAMIN-15MCG+ZINC SULFATE-61.8MG
Dose Form : TABLET
Description : FERANID TAB
Route Of Administration : ORAL
Pack : 10
Drug Ingredient Information
SODIUM FEREDETATE-700MG+FOLIC ACID-1.5MG+METHYLCOBALAMIN-15MCG+ZINC SULFATE-61.8MG

SODIUM FEREDETATE

Information for patients
Drug Information (irondeficiency anaemia). The form of iron used in this product means that it is less likely to cause stomach upsets than other iron-containing medicines, and will not discolour teeth. It is taken by: • pregnant women when other forms of oral iron may not be well tolerated • children and adults who have become anaemic as a result of having rheumatoid arthritis.
Drug Alert
Alert no data available
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug • are allergic to any of the ingredients in the product. • have a history of sensitivity to iron-containing preparations.
Drug Special Care no data available
Drug Drug Interactions Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. These include iron-containing medicines or tonics.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction Tell your doctor before taking Sodium feredetate if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or breast-feeding.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction Tell your doctor before taking Sodium feredetate if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or breast-feeding.
Drug Machinery Interaction Sodium feredetate is not expected to have an effect on your ability to drive or operate machinery.
Drug More Information no data available
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info no data available
Drug quanitty Adults (over 12 years) 1 or 2 x 5ml spoonful Elderly (over 65 years) 1 or 2 x 5ml spoonful Children (6 to 12 years) 1 x 5ml spoonful Younger Children (1 to 5 years) ½ x 5ml spoonful (2.5ml) Infants (up to 12 months, including premature babies) ½ x 5ml spoonful (2.5ml) TWICE a day. Smaller doses should be used at the start of treatment.
Drug Dose The liquid is to be taken by mouth. Always take Sodium feredetate exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. Take the following doses 3 times a day using either a 5ml spoon or a syringe:
Excess Drug Consumption If you accidentally take too much Sodium feredetate or give too much to a child, tell your doctor immediately or contact your hospital. Take this leaflet, the container and any remaining Sodium feredetate with you, if you can. An overdose may cause: • sickness (this may have some blood in it) or make you feel sick • stomach pains • diarrhoea • blood in your stools • tiredness • cold and sweaty skin • fast heart beat • high blood sugar • high blood acidity (metabolic acidosis).
Forgot Drug Consumption If you forget to take a dose, take the next dose at the usual time. Do not take a double dose to make up for a forgotten dose.
Stop Drug Consumption Do not stop the drug untill your doctor says you to do so.
Possible Side Effects
General Information no data available
Common Drug Side Effects Like all medicines, Sodium feredetate can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. You may feel sick or have mild diarrhoea in the early stages of treatment. These effects should quickly disappear if you stop taking Sodium feredetate for a short time. When treatment is restarted, a lower dose of your medicine should be taken.
Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Very Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Drug Side Effects Symptoms no data available
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Keep out of the reach and sight of children. The product should be stored below 30°C. Do not use Sodium feredetate after the expiry date printed on the label. Once opened the product should be used within 3 months (there is a space on the label to record the date it was first opened). If the product shows any signs of deterioration please return it to your pharmacist. Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

FOLIC ACID

Information for patients
Drug Information The name of your medicine is Folic acid. It contains folic acid. This belongs to a group of vitamins called ‘B vitamins’. Folic acid is used to help prevent babies being born with Neural Tube Defects such as Spina Bifida. n You should use this medicine if you are trying to become pregnant and also during the first three months of your pregnancy. n You should also use this when you know you are pregnant or you think you are pregnant and continue to use it for the first three months of your pregnancy.
Drug Alert
Alert You are allergic (hypersensitive) to folic acid or any other ingredients in this liquid (listed in Section 6) Signs of an allergic reaction include a rash, itching or shortness of breath n You have a tumour or cancer
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug You are allergic (hypersensitive) to folic acid or any other ingredients in this liquid (listed in Section 6) Signs of an allergic reaction include a rash, itching or shortness of breath n You have a tumour or cancer
Drug Special Care You have been told that you have something called ‘pernicious anaemia’ or a ‘vitamin B12 deficiency’.
Drug Drug Interactions Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines. This includes medicines you buy without a prescription, including herbal medicines. This is because Folic acid can affect the way some other medicines work. Also, some medicines can affect the way Folic acid works. In particular, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following: n Medicines for epilepsy and fits such as phenytoin or primidone. Your doctor may need to change the amount you are taking. This is because Folic acid may make these medicines work less well.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding. If you are a woman and you are pregnant, this medicine is unlikely to cause any harm to you or your unborn child.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding. If you are a woman and you are pregnant, this medicine is unlikely to cause any harm to you or your unborn child.
Drug Machinery Interaction Folic acid is not likely to affect you being able to drive or use any tools or machines
Drug More Information
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info to be taken orally
Drug quanitty as per the requirement
Drug Dose as per the requirement
Excess Drug Consumption There have been no cases of people taking an overdose with this medicine. However, if you think you have taken more than you should, talk to your doctor or go to a hospital straight away.
Forgot Drug Consumption If you forget a dose, take it as soon as you remember it. However, if it is nearly time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Do not take a double dose (two doses at the same time) to make up for a forgotten dose.
Stop Drug Consumption Do not stop the drug untill your doctor says you to do so.
Possible Side Effects
General Information no data available
Common Drug Side Effects An allergic reaction may include: n Any kind of skin rash, flaking skin, boils or sore lips and mouth n Sudden wheezing, fluttering or tightness of the chest or collapse. Tell your doctor if you get any of these side effects: n Feeling sick (nausea), being sick (vomiting) or an upset stomach.
Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Very Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Drug Side Effects Symptoms
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Keep out of the reach and sight of children n Do not store above 25°C n Take back to the pharmacy 1 month after opening. n Do not use after the expiry date which is stated on the label and carton (Exp: month, year) n The expiry date refers to the last day of that month n Do not use Folic acid if you notice a change in the appearance or smell of the medicine. Talk to your pharmacist n Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment

METHYLCOBALAMIN

Information for patients
Drug Information Vitamin B12, is used to treat vitamin B12 deficiency, cyanide poisoning, and hereditary deficiency of transcobalamin II.[3] It is also given as part of the schilling test for detecting pernicious anemia.[3] For cyanide poisoning, large amount may be given intravenously, and sometimes in combination with sodium thiosulfate.[4] The mechanism of action is straightforward: the hydroxycobalamin hydroxide ligand is displaced by the toxic cyanide ion, and the resulting harmless B12 complex is excreted in urine. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration approved (in 2006) the use of hydroxocobalamin for acute treatment of cyanide poisoning.[5] High vitamin B12 level in elderly individuals may protect against brain atrophy or shrinkage, associated with Alzheimer's disease and impaired cognitive function.[6] High-dose administration of Vitamin B12 has been additionally validated to stimulate the activity of the body's TH1 suppressor T-Cells, which then down-regulates the over-production of the allagen antibody 1gE in allergic individuals.
Drug Alert
Alert no data available
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug no data available
Drug Special Care Vitamin B12 supplements in theory should be avoided in people sensitive or allergic to cobalamin, cobalt, or any other product ingredients. However, direct allergy to a vitamin or nutrient is extremely rare, and if reported, other causes should be sought.
Drug Drug Interactions Aminosalicylic acid (para-aminosalicylic acid, PAS, Paser): Aminosalicylic acid can reduce oral vitamin B12 absorption, possibly by as much as 55%, as part of a general malabsorption syndrome. Megaloblastic changes, and occasional cases of symptomatic anemia have occurred, usually after doses of 8 to 12 g/day for several months. Vitamin B12 levels should be monitored in people taking aminosalicylic acid for more than one month. Antibiotics: An increased bacterial load can bind significant amounts of vitamin B12 in the gut, preventing its absorption. In people with bacterial overgrowth of the small bowel, antibiotics such as metronidazole (Flagyl) can actually improve vitamin B12 status. The effects of most antibiotics on gastrointestinal bacteria are unlikely to have clinically significant effects on vitamin B12 levels. Hormonal contraception: The data regarding the effects of oral contraceptives on vitamin B12serum levels are conflicting. Some studies have found reduced serum levels in oral contraceptive users, but others have found no effect despite use of oral contraceptives for up to 6 months. When oral contraceptive use is stopped, normalization of vitamin B12 levels usually occurs. Lower vitamin B12serum levels seen with oral contraceptives probably are not clinically significant. Chloramphenicol (Chloromycetin): Limited case reports suggest that chloramphenicol can delay or interrupt the reticulocyte response to supplemental vitamin B12 in some patients. Blood counts should be monitored closely if this combination cannot be avoided. Cobalt irradiation: Cobalt irradiation of the small bowel can decrease gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of vitamin B12. Colchicine: Colchicine in doses of 1.9 to 3.9 mg/day can disrupt normal intestinal mucosal function, leading to malabsorption of several nutrients, including vitamin B12. Lower doses do not seem to have a significant effect on vitamin B12 absorption after 3 years of colchicine therapy. The significance of this interaction is unclear. Vitamin B12 levels should be monitored in people taking large doses of colchicine for prolonged periods. Colestipol (Colestid), cholestyramine (Questran): These resins used for sequestering bile acids to decrease cholesterol, can decrease gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of vitamin B12. It is unlikely this interaction will deplete body stores of vitamin B12 unless there are other factors contributing to deficiency. In a group of children treated with cholestyramine for up to 2.5 years, there was not any change in serum vitamin B12 levels. Routine supplements are not necessary. H2-receptor antagonists: include cimetidine (Tagamet), famotidine (Pepcid), nizatidine (Axid), and ranitidine (Zantac). Reduced secretion of gastric acid and pepsin produced by H2 blockers can reduce absorption of protein-bound (dietary) vitamin B12, but not of supplemental vitamin B12. Gastric acid is needed to release vitamin B12 from protein for absorption. Clinically significant vitamin B12 deficiency and megaloblastic anemia are unlikely, unless H2 blocker therapy is prolonged (2 years or more), or the person's diet is poor. It is also more likely if the person is rendered achlorhydric(with complete absence of gastric acid secretion), which occurs more frequently with proton pump inhibitors than H2 blockers. Vitamin B12 levels should be monitored in people taking high doses of H2 blockers for prolonged periods. Metformin (Glucophage): Metformin may reduce serum folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. These changes can lead to hyperhomocysteinemia, adding to the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes.[citation needed] There are also rare reports of megaloblastic anemia in people who have taken metformin for five years or more. Reduced serum levels of vitamin B12 occur in up to 30% of people taking metformin chronically.[20][21] However, clinically significant deficiency is not likely to develop if dietary intake of vitamin B12 is adequate. Deficiency can be corrected with vitamin B12 supplements even if metformin is continued. The metformin-induced malabsorption of vitamin B12 is reversible by oral calcium supplementation.[22] The general clinical significance of metformin upon B12 levels is as yet unknown.[23] Neomycin: Absorption of vitamin B12 can be reduced by neomycin, but prolonged use of large doses is needed to induce pernicious anemia. Supplements are not usually needed with normal doses. Nicotine: Nicotine can reduce serum vitamin B12 levels. The need for vitamin B12 supplementation in smokers has not been adequately studied. Nitrous oxide: Nitrous oxide inactivates the cobalamin form of vitamin B12 by oxidation. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, including sensory neuropathy, myelopathy, and encephalopathy, can occur within days or weeks of exposure to nitrous oxide anesthesia in people with subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency. Symptoms are treated with high doses of vitamin B12, but recovery can be slow and incomplete. People with normal vitamin B12 levels have sufficient vitamin B12 stores to make the effects of nitrous oxide insignificant, unless exposure is repeated and prolonged (such as recreational use). Vitamin B12 levels should be checked in people with risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency prior to using nitrous oxide anesthesia. Chronic nitrous oxide B12 poisoning (usually from use of nitrous oxide as a recreational drug), however, may result in B12 functional deficiency even with normal measured blood levels of B12.[24] Phenytoin (Dilantin), phenobarbital, primidone (Mysoline): These anticonvulsants have been associated with reduced vitamin B12 absorption, and reduced serum and cerebrospinal fluidlevels in some patients. This may contribute to the megaloblastic anemia, primarily caused by folate deficiency, associated with these drugs. It is also suggested that reduced vitamin B12 levels may contribute to the neuropsychiatric side effects of these drugs. Patients should be encouraged to maintain adequate dietary vitamin B12 intake. Folate and vitamin B12 status should be checked if symptoms of anemia develop. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): The PPIs include omeprazole (Prilosec, Losec), lansoprazole(Prevacid), rabeprazole (Aciphex), pantoprazole (Protonix, Pantoloc), and esomeprazole (Nexium). The reduced secretion of gastric acid and pepsin produced by PPIs can reduce absorption of protein-bound (dietary) vitamin B12, but not supplemental vitamin B12. Gastric acid is needed to release vitamin B12 from protein for absorption. Reduced vitamin B12 levels may be more common with PPIs than with H2-blockers, because they are more likely to produce achlorhydria (complete absence of gastric acid secretion). However, clinically significant vitamin B12 deficiency is unlikely, unless PPI therapy is prolonged (2 years or more) or dietary vitamin intake is low. Vitamin B12 levels should be monitored in people taking high doses of PPIs for prolonged periods. Zidovudine (AZT, Combivir, Retrovir): Reduced serum vitamin B12 levels may occur when zidovudine therapy is started. This adds to other factors that cause low vitamin B12 levels in people with HIV, and might contribute to the hematological toxicity associated with zidovudine. However, the data suggest vitamin B12 supplements are not helpful for people taking zidovudine.[citation needed] Folic acid: Folic acid, particularly in large doses, can mask vitamin B12 deficiency by completely correcting hematological abnormalities. In vitamin B12 deficiency, folic acid can produce complete resolution of the characteristic megaloblastic anemia, while allowing potentially irreversible neurological damage (from continued inactivity of methylmalonyl mutase) to progress. Thus, vitamin B12 status should be determined before folic acid is given as monotherapy. Potassium: Potassium supplements can reduce absorption of vitamin B12 in some people. This effect has been reported with potassium chloride and, to a lesser extent, with potassium citrate. Potassium might contribute to vitamin B12 deficiency in some people with other risk factors, but routine supplements are not necessary.[
Drug Pregnancy Interaction no data available
Drug Breast feeding Interaction no data available
Drug Machinery Interaction no data available
Drug More Information Alcohol (ethanol): Excessive alcohol intake lasting longer than two weeks can decrease vitamin B12 absorption from the gastrointestinal tract.[c
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info no data available
Drug quanitty The dietary reference intake for an adult ranges from 2 to 3 µg per day.[9] Vitamin B12 is believed to be safe when used orally in amounts that do not exceed the recommended dietary allowance (RDA). There have also been studies that showed no adverse consequences of doses above the RDA.[10] The RDA for vitamin B12 in pregnant women is 2.6 µg per day and 2.8 µg during lactation periods.[citation needed] There is insufficient reliable information available about the safety of consuming greater amounts of vitamin B12 during pregnancy. The Vegan Society, the Vegetarian Resource Group, and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, among others, recommend that vegans either consistently eat foods fortified with B12 or take a daily or weekly B12 supplement.[11][12][13] Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B12 for vegetarians and vegans. In addition, adults age 51 and older are recommended to consume B12 fortified food or supplements to meet the RDA, because they are a population at an increased risk of deficiency
Drug Dose Can you take too much? No. Unlike other supplements which you can overdose on, your body doesn’t store excess vitamin B12. But you don’t want to waste it. I usually go with ~1cc every week or so.
Excess Drug Consumption no data available
Forgot Drug Consumption contact your doctor
Stop Drug Consumption do not stop the medicine untill adviced by your doctor
Possible Side Effects
General Information no data available
Common Drug Side Effects Vitamin B12 has extremely low toxicity and even taking it in enormous doses appears not to be harmful to healthy individuals.[17][18] Hematologic: Peripheral vascular thrombosis has been reported. Treatment of vitamin B12 deficiency can unmask polycythemia vera, which is characterized by an increase in blood volume and the number of red blood cells. The correction of megaloblastic anemia with vitamin B12 can result in fatal hypokalemia and gout in susceptible individuals, and it can obscure folate deficiency in megaloblastic anemia. Caution is warranted. Leber's disease: Vitamin B12 in the form of cyanocobalamin is contraindicated in early Leber's disease, which is hereditary optic nerve atrophy. Cyanocobalamin can cause severe and swift optic atrophy, but other forms of vitamin B12 are available. However, the sources of this statement are not clear, while an opposing view[19] concludes: "The clinical picture of optic neuropathy associated with vitamin B12 deficiency shows similarity to that of Leber's disease optic neuropathy. Both involve the nerve fibres of the papillomacular bundle. The present case reports suggest that optic neuropathy in patients carrying a primary LHON mtDNA mutation may be precipitated by vitamin B12 deficiency. Therefore, known carriers should take care to have an adequate dietary intake of vitamin B12 and malabsorption syndromes like those occurring in familial pernicious anaemia or after gastric surgery should be excluded."
Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Very Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Drug Side Effects Symptoms no data available
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Precautions: Keep away from heat. Keep away from sources of ignition. Empty containers pose a fire risk, evaporate the residue under a fume hood. Ground all equipment containing material. Do not ingest. Do not breathe dust. If ingested, seek medical advice immediately and show the container or the label. Keep away from incompatibles such as oxidizing agents. Storage: Keep container tightly closed. Keep container in a cool, well-ventilated area.

ZINC SULFATE

Information for patients
Drug Information This medication is a mineral used to treat or prevent low levels of zinc.OTHER This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.This medication may also be used to promote wound healing.
Drug Alert
Alert
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: low blood levels of copper.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history.T
Drug Special Care
Drug Drug Interactions If you are taking this medication under your doctor's direction, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription products you may use, especially of: penicillamine, phosphorus containing products.This product can decrease the absorption of other drugs such as tetracycline antibiotics (e.g., doxycycline, minocycline), bisphosphonates (e.g., alendronate), and quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin). Therefore, separate your doses of these medications as far as possible from your doses of this product. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about how long you should wait between doses and for help finding a dosing schedule that will work with all your medications.This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using this medication.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction This medication passes into breast milk. While there have been no reports of harm to nursing infants, consult your doctor before breast-feeding.
Drug Machinery Interaction
Drug More Information
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info Do not share this medication with others.It is important to maintain a well balanced diet while taking this medicine.Foods containing good sources of zinc include lean red meats, seafood, peas, and beans.Laboratory tests (e.g., zinc and copper levels) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details
Drug quanitty
Drug Dose Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor or on the package.Take this medication 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals. May be taken with food if it upsets your stomach. Best to swallow whole. Do not crush or chew.Avoid milk, bran, grains, or cereals within 2 hours of taking this medicine.Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, use it at the same time(s) each day.
Excess Drug Consumption If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. Symptoms of overdose may include severe nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fainting, and shortness of breath.
Forgot Drug Consumption If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.
Stop Drug Consumption
Possible Side Effects
General Information
Common Drug Side Effects Nausea, stomach upset, heartburn may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: fever, chills, sore throat, sores in mouth, unusual tiredness, weakness.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.
Rare Drug Side Effects
Very Rare Drug Side Effects
Drug Side Effects Symptoms
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Store at room temperature between 59 and 86 degrees F (15-30 degrees C) away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

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