NILOL TABLET

Manufacturer : INT-INTAS LABORATORIES LTD
Composition : ATENOLOL-50MG+NIFEDIPINE-20MG
Dose Form : TABLET
Description : NILOL TAB
Route Of Administration : ORAL
Pack : 10
In stock
SKU
NIL0001
₹61.00
Manufacturer : INT-INTAS LABORATORIES LTD
Composition : ATENOLOL-50MG+NIFEDIPINE-20MG
Dose Form : TABLET
Description : NILOL TAB
Route Of Administration : ORAL
Pack : 10

Drug Ingredient Information

ATENOLOL-50MG+NIFEDIPINE-20MG

ATENOLOL

Information for patients
Drug Information Atenolol contains a medicine called atenolol. This belongs to a group of medicines called beta blockers. Atenolol is used to: •Treat high blood pressure (hypertension). •Treat uneven heart beats (arrhythmias). •Help prevent chest pain (angina). •Protect the heart in the early treatment after a heart attack (myocardial infarction). It works by making your heart beat more slowly and with less force.
Drug Alert
Alert Do not take Atenolol if: •You are allergic (hypersensitive) to atenolol. •You have ever had any of the following heart problems: -heart failure which is not under control (this usually makes you breathless and causes your ankles to swell) - second- or third-degree heart block (a condition which may be treated by a pacemaker) - very slow or very uneven heart beats, very low blood pressure or very poor circulation. • You have a tumour called phaeochromocytoma that is not being treated. This is usually near your kidney and can cause high blood pressure. If you are being treated for phaeochromocytoma, your doctor will give you another medicine, called an alpha-blocker, to take as well as your Atenolol. •You have been told that you have higher than normal levels of acid in your blood (metabolic acidosis). Do not take Atenolol if any of the above apply to you. If you are not sure, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Atenolol.
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug Do not take Atenolol if: •You are allergic (hypersensitive) to atenolol. •You have ever had any of the following heart problems: -heart failure which is not under control (this usually makes you breathless and causes your ankles to swell) - second- or third-degree heart block (a condition which may be treated by a pacemaker) - very slow or very uneven heart beats, very low blood pressure or very poor circulation. • You have a tumour called phaeochromocytoma that is not being treated. This is usually near your kidney and can cause high blood pressure. If you are being treated for phaeochromocytoma, your doctor will give you another medicine, called an alpha-blocker, to take as well as your Atenolol. •You have been told that you have higher than normal levels of acid in your blood (metabolic acidosis). Do not take Atenolol if any of the above apply to you. If you are not sure, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Atenolol.
Drug Special Care Check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking Atenolol if: •You have asthma, wheezing or any other similar breathing problems, or you get allergic reactions, for example to insect stings. If you have ever had asthma or wheezing, do not take this medicine without first checking with your doctor. •You have a type of chest pain (angina) called Prinzmetal’s angina. •You have poor blood circulation or controlled heart failure. •You have first-degree heart block. •You have diabetes. Your medicine may change how you respond to having low blood sugar. You may feel your heart beating faster. •You have thyrotoxicosis (a condition caused by an overactive thyroid gland). Your medicine may hide the symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. •You have problems with your kidneys. You may need to have some check-ups during your treatment. If you are not sure if any of the above apply to you, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Atenolol.
Drug Drug Interactions Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, or have recently taken, any other medicines. This includes medicines that you buy without a prescription and herbal medicines. This is because Atenolol can affect the way some other medicines work and some medicines can have an effect on Atenolol. In particular, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: •Clonidine (for high blood pressure or migraine). If you are taking clonidine and Atenolol together, do not stop taking clonidine unless your doctor tells you to do so. If you have to stop taking clonidine, your doctor will give you careful instructions about how to do it. •Verapamil, diltiazem and nifedipine (for high blood pressure or chest pain). •Disopyramide, quinidine or amiodarone (for an uneven heart beat). •Digoxin (for heart problems). •Adrenaline, also known as epinephrine (a medicine that stimulates the heart). •Ibuprofen or indometacin (for pain and inflammation). •Insulin or medicines that you take by mouth for diabetes. •Medicines to treat nose or sinus congestion or other cold remedies (including those you can buy in the pharmacy). Operations If you go into hospital to have an operation, tell the anaesthetist or medical staff that you are taking Atenolol. This is because you can get low blood pressure (hypotension) if you are given certain anaesthetics while you are taking Atenolol.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction Talk to your doctor before taking Atenolol if you are pregnant, may become pregnant or are breast-feeding.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction Talk to your doctor before taking Atenolol if you are pregnant, may become pregnant or are breast-feeding.
Drug Machinery Interaction •Your medicine is not likely to affect you being able to drive or use any tools or machines. However, it is best to wait to see how your medicine affects you before trying these activities. •If you feel dizzy or tired when taking this medicine, do not drive or use any tools or machines. Important information about some of the ingredients of Atenolol
Drug More Information no data available
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info no data available
Drug quanitty Adults •High blood pressure (hypertension): the usual dose is 50 mg to 100 mg (two to four 5 ml spoonfuls) a day. •Chest pain (angina): the usual dose is 100 mg (four 5 ml spoonfuls) a day or 50 mg (two 5 ml spoonfuls) twice a day. •Uneven heart beats (arrhythmias): the usual dose is 50 mg to 100 mg (two to four 5 ml spoonfuls) a day. •The early treatment of a heart attack (myocardial infarction): the usual dose is 50 mg to 100 mg (two to four 5 ml spoonfuls) a day. Elderly people If you are an elderly person, your doctor may decide to give you a lower dose, particularly if you have problems with your kidneys. People with kidney problems If you have severe kidney problems your doctor may decide to give you a lower dose. Children Your medicine must not be given to children.
Drug Dose Always take Atenolol exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. •Your doctor will tell you how much to take each day and when to take it. Read the label on the container to remind you what the doctor said. •Atenolol should be swallowed. •Try to take your medicine at the same time each day
Excess Drug Consumption If you take more Atenolol than prescribed by your doctor, talk to a doctor or go to a hospital straight away. Take along any left over , as well as the container and label, so that the can be identified.
Forgot Drug Consumption If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Do not take a double dose to make up for a forgotten dose.
Stop Drug Consumption Do not stop taking Atenolol without talking to your doctor. In some cases, you may need to stop taking it gradually
Possible Side Effects
General Information If you have an allergic reaction, see a doctor straight away. The signs may include raised lumps on your skin (weals) or swelling of your face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat.
Common Drug Side Effects •You may notice that your pulse rate becomes slower while you are taking Atenolol. This is normal, but if you are concerned please tell your doctor about it. •Cold hands and feet. •Diarrhoea. •Feeling sick (nausea). •Feeling tired.
Rare Drug Side Effects •Heart block (which may cause an abnormal heart beat, dizziness, tiredness or fainting). •Numbness and spasm in your fingers which is followed by warmth and pain (Raynaud’s disease). •Mood changes. •Nightmares. •Feeling confused. •Changes in personality (psychoses). •Hallucinations. •Headache. •Dizziness, particularly when standing up. •Tingling of your hands. •Being unable to get an erection (impotence). •Dry mouth. •Dry eyes. •Disturbances of vision. •Thinning of your hair. •Skin rash. •Reduced numbers of platelets in your blood (this may make you bruise more easily). •Purplish marks on your skin. •Jaundice (causing yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes).
Very Rare Drug Side Effects •Changes to some of the cells or other parts of your blood. Your doctor may take blood samples every so often to check whether Atenolol has had any effect on your blood. Conditions that may get worse If you have any of the following conditions, they may get worse when you start to take your medicine: •Psoriasis (a skin condition). •Being short of breath or having swollen ankles (if you have heart failure). •Asthma or breathing problems. •Poor circulation. Do not be concerned by this list of side effects. You may not get any of them. If any of the side effects get serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.
Drug Side Effects Symptoms •Disturbed sleep.
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine •Keep your medicine in a safe place where children cannot see or reach it. Your medicine could harm them. •Do not store above 25oC. Store in the original container. •Do not use your medicine after the expiry date which is stated on the label. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month. Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines that are no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

NIFEDIPINE

Information for patients
Drug Information Nifedipine tablets are used either to treat high blood pressure or to prevent chronic stable angina, one of a number of types of angina. Nifedipine tablets are not used for the relief of a sudden attack of angina. Each tablets contain the active substance nifedipine which belongs to a group of medicines called calcium channel blockers. They work by opening up blood vessels in the body to lower blood pressure and improve the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed it for another reason.
Drug Alert
Alert
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug Do not take Nifedipine if you have an allergy to: • nifedipine or any of the ingredients in the contents • active substances similar to nifedipine such as: amlodipine, felodipine and israpidine. Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: • shortness of breath • wheezing or difficulty breathing • swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body • rash, itching or hives on the skin. Do not take Nifedipine if you have had a heart attack in the last 8 days, or if you are in cardiogenic shock (very low blood pressure due to a failing heart). Do not take this medicine after the expiry date printed on the pack and blister. If it has expired return it to your pharmacist for disposal. Do not take this medicine if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If the packaging is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If you are not sure whether you should start taking this medicine, talk to your doctor.
Drug Special Care Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foods, preservatives or dyes. Tell your doctor if you have or have had any of the following medical conditions: • heart failure • other heart or blood vessel disorders • low blood pressure • narrowing of the aorta • liver disease • diabetes • kidney disease If you have not told your doctor about any of the above, tell him/her before you start taking Nifedipine. Nifedipine contains lactose. If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, tell your doctor before taking it. Things you must do • Take Nifedipine tablets exactly as told by your doctor. If you do not follow your doctor’s instruction, you may not get control of your blood pressure or relief from your angina. • If you are about to be started on any new medicine, remind your doctor and pharmacist that you are taking Nifedipine. • Tell your doctor if you continue to have angina attacks or if they become more frequent while you are taking Nifedipine tablets. • Tell all doctors, dentists and pharmacists who are treating you that you are taking Nifedipine tablets. • The use of Nifedipine may affect the results of certain laboratory tests or x-rays. If you are about to have any tests or x-rays, tell your doctor that you are taking this medicine. • If you become pregnant while taking this medicine, tell your doctor immediately. Things you must not do Do not give this medicine to anyone else, even if their symptoms seem similar to yours. Do not take Nifedipine to treat any other complaints unless your doctor tells you to.
Drug Drug Interactions Do not take Nifedipine tablets if you are taking another medicine containing the active substance rifampicin, an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis and other serious infections. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines, including any that you get without a prescription from your pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop. Some medicines and Nifedipine may interfere with each other. These include medicines used to treat: • stomach ulcers, such as cimetidine, cisapride • angina (chest pain), such as diltiazem, nitrates • heart failure, such as digoxin, betablockers • arrhythmia (fast or irregular heartbeats), such as quinidine • bacterial infections, such as quinupristin and dalfopristin • tuberculosis, such as rifampicin • medicines used to treat epilepsy, such as phenytoin • asthma, such as theophylline These medicines may be affected by Nifedipine or may affect how well it works. You may need to take different amounts of your medicine or you may need to take different medicines. Your doctor or pharmacist has a more complete list of medicines to avoid while taking Nifedipine. You should not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while you are taking Nifedipine because this can cause unwanted changes in the blood pressure lowering effect of the tablets.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction Do not take this medicine in the first 20 weeks of your pregnancy. It may affect your developing baby if you take it during this period.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction Do not breast-feed if you are taking this medicine. The active ingredient in Nifedipine passes into breast milk and there is a possibility that your baby may be affected.
Drug Machinery Interaction Be careful driving or operating machinery until you know how Nifedipine affects you. It may cause dizziness or fainting in some patients, especially when they first start taking the medicine. If you have angina, be careful not to overdo physical activities when you first start taking Nifedipine. You may feel better when you start taking it,but you will need time to improve your physical fitness.
Drug More Information
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info Follow all directions given to you by your doctor or pharmacist carefully.
Drug quanitty The correct dose of Nifedipine to take has been decided by your doctor. Make sure you follow the instructions given to you by your doctor. The usual dosage is 10 mg to 20 mg twice daily. If required, your doctor may increase the dose up to 40 mg twice daily. The maximum dose of 80 mg (daily)should not be exceeded.
Drug Dose How to take it The tablets are to be swallowed whole with some liquid, either with or without a meal. Do not halve the tablets. When to take it The tablets are usually taken every 12 hours. How long to take it Your doctor will determine how long you should take Nifedipine tablets.
Excess Drug Consumption Immediately telephone your doctor or Poisons Information Centre for advice, or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital, if you think that you or anyone else may have taken too many Nifedipine tablets. Do this even if there are no signs of discomfort or poisoning. You may need urgent medical attention. Signs of an overdose include feeling dizzy and fainting due to drop in blood pressure, irregular or rapid heart beats, shortness of breath and even loss of consciousness.
Forgot Drug Consumption If you have forgotten to take your Nifedipine tablet(s) at the right time, take it as soon as you remember, then continue as normal for the next dose. If you do not remember until it is almost time to take your next dose [i.e. within 6 (six) hours of your next dose], then skip the dose that you forgot but be sure to take the next dose when it is due. Do NOT take a double dose to make up for the dose that you missed. If you have missed several doses, consult your doctor.
Stop Drug Consumption Do not stop taking your medicine or lower the dosage without checking with your doctor. If you stop taking it suddenly, your condition may worsen or you may have unwanted side effects.
Possible Side Effects
General Information Tell your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible if you do not feel well while you are taking Nifedipine. All medicines have side effects. Sometimes they are serious, most of the time they are not. In serious cases, you may need medical attention. Do not be alarmed by the following lists of side effects. You may not experience any of them. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to answer any questions you may have.
Common Drug Side Effects Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you notice any of the following and they worry you. The list below includes the more common side effects of your medicine. They are usually mild andshort-lived. • headache • flushing • constipation • generally feeling unwell • general swelling and/or swelling of the arm, ankles or legs Your doctor may need to monitor your liver function, as Nifedipine can increase your liver enzymes. You may not experience any specific symptoms. Swelling at the back of the throat can occur, which may cause difficulty in talking or breathing. Tell your doctor if this occurs; you may need urgent medical attention.
Rare Drug Side Effects If any of the following happen, stop taking Nifedipine and tell your doctor immediately or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital: • chest pain • signs of allergy such as rash, itching or hives on the skin, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or other parts of the body, shortness of breath, wheezing, or trouble breathing • signs of liver problems such as yellowing of the skin and/or eyes (jaundice) • signs of frequent infections such as fever, severe chills, sore throat or mouth ulcers These serious side effects are very rare. If you have these side effects you may need urgent medical attention.
Very Rare Drug Side Effects Very rarely, some people experience a purple/brown discolouration of the skin or redness, flaking and itching of the skin. Also, it has been reported for some people to develop a rash or blistering of the skin when they are exposed to sunlight. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. In a small number of cases of in vitro fertilisation, medicines like nifedipine appeared to have interfered with the normal function of sperm. This effect went away after the medicine was stopped. In those men who are taking Nifedipine tablets and are repeatedly unsuccessful in fathering a child by in vitro fertilisation, the medicine should be considered as one of the possible causes if no other explanation can be found. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you notice anything that is making you feel unwell.
Drug Side Effects Symptoms
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Storage Keep your tablets in the pack until it is time to take them. If you take the tablets out of the pack they may not keep well. Keep the medicine in a cool dry place where the temperature stays below 25°C. Do not store it or any other medicine in the bathroom, near a sink, or on a window-sill. Do not leave it in the car. Heat and damp can destroy some medicines. Keep the tablets where children cannot reach them. A locked cupboard at least one-and ahalf metres above the ground is a good place to store medicines. Disposal If your doctor tells you to stop taking Nifedipine, ask your pharmacist what to do with any tablets left over. Return any unused medicine to your pharmacist.

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