PUBERGIN 2000I.U INJECTION

Manufacturer : USK-UNI SANKYO LIMITED
Composition : HUMAN NORMAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN-2000UNITS
Dose Form : INJECTION
Description : PUBERGIN 2000 UNITS
Route Of Administration : PARENTERAL
Pack : 1
In stock
SKU
PUB0005
₹409.00
Manufacturer : USK-UNI SANKYO LIMITED
Composition : HUMAN NORMAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN-2000UNITS
Dose Form : INJECTION
Description : PUBERGIN 2000 UNITS
Route Of Administration : PARENTERAL
Pack : 1

Drug Ingredient Information

HUMAN NORMAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN-2000UNITS

HUMAN NORMAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN

Information for patients
Drug Information Immune globulin intravenous is a sterilized solution made from human plasma. It contains the antibodies to help your body protect itself against infection from various diseases. Immune globulin is used to treat primary immune deficiency, and to reduce the risk of infection in individuals with poorly functioning immune systems such as those with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). IGIV is also used to increase platelets (blood clotting cells) in people with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and to prevent aneurysm caused by a weakening of the main artery in the heart associated with Kawasaki syndrome. Immune globulin is also used to treat chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), a debilitating nerve disorder that causes muscle weakness and can affect daily activities. Immune globulin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Drug Alert
Alert no data available
Before Consuming the Medicine
Avoid Drug Immune globulin can be harmful to the kidneys, and these effects are increased when immune globulin is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before using immune globulin, tell your doctor about all other medications you use. Many other drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines) can be harmful to the kidneys. Before you use immune globulin intravenous, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, diabetes (especially if you use insulin), a history of stroke or blood clot, heart disease, high blood pressure, a condition called paraproteinemia, or if you are over 65 years old. To be sure this medication is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be checked. Do not miss any scheduled appointments. Using immune globulin can cause you to have unusual results with certain blood glucose tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using immune globulin. Immune globulin is made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although immune globulin is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.
Drug Special Care You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an immune globulin or if you have immune globulin A (IgA) deficiency with antibody to IgA. If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use immune globulin intravenous: kidney disease; diabetes (especially if you use insulin); a history of stroke or blood clot; heart disease or high blood pressure; a condition called paraproteinemia; or if you are over 65 years old. FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether immune globulin is harmful to an unborn baby. Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known if immune globulin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
Drug Drug Interactions Immune globulin can be harmful to the kidneys, and these effects are increased when immune globulin is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking immune globulin, tell your doctor if you are also using: lithium (Lithobid); methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); pain or arthritis medicines such as aspirin (Anacin, Excedrin), acetaminophen (Tylenol), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and others; medicines used to treat ulcerative colitis, such as mesalamine (Pentasa) or sulfasalazine (Azulfidine); medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, such as cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), sirolimus (Rapamune) or tacrolimus (Prograf); IV antibiotics such as amphotericin B (Fungizone, AmBisome, Amphotec, Abelcet), amikacin (Amikin), bacitracin (Baci-IM), capreomycin (Capastat), gentamicin (Garamycin), kanamycin (Kantrex), streptomycin, or vancomycin (Vancocin, Vancoled); antiviral medicines such as adefovir (Hepsera), cidofovir (Vistide), or foscarnet (Foscavir); or cancer medicine such as aldesleukin (Proleukin), carmustine (BiCNU, Gliadel), cisplatin (Platinol), ifosfamide (Ifex), oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), plicamycin (Mithracin), streptozocin (Zanosar), or tretinoin (Vesanoid). This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with immune globulin. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.
Drug Pregnancy Interaction FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether immune globulin is harmful to an unborn baby. Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.
Drug Breast feeding Interaction It is not known if immune globulin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
Drug Machinery Interaction no data available
Drug More Information Do not receive live-virus vaccines such as measles, mumps, or rubella. The live vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease.
How to take the Medicine
Consumption Info no data available
Drug quanitty no data available
Drug Dose Use immune globulin intravenous exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use it in larger doses or for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Immune globulin is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be shown how to use your medicine at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles, IV tubing, and other items used in giving the medicine. Immune globulin intravenous should not be injected into a muscle or under the skin. Immune globulin intravenous is usually given every 3 to 4 weeks. Your dosing schedule may be different. Follow your doctor's instructions. To be sure this medication is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney function may also need to be checked. Do not miss any scheduled appointments. Using immune globulin can cause you to have unusual results with certain blood glucose tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using immune globulin. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has any particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription. Throw away any unused medicine that is left over after injecting your dose. Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets. Some brands of immune globulin should be stored in a refrigerator, while others can be kept at room temperature. Follow the directions on your prescription label or ask your pharmacist if you have questions about how to store the medication. Do not allow the medicine to freeze.
Excess Drug Consumption Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.
Forgot Drug Consumption Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.
Stop Drug Consumption Do not stop the drug untill your doctor says you to do so.
Possible Side Effects
General Information no data available
Common Drug Side Effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath; drowsiness, confusion, mood changes, increased thirst, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting; trouble breathing, blue lips; fever with headache, neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light, purple spots on the skin, and/or seizure (convulsions); pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion or weakness; slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing (breathing may stop); sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling like you might pass out; fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); Less serious side effects may include: headache; dizziness; upset stomach, mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea; back pain, joint pain, minor chest pain; mild itching or skin rash; or runny or stuffy nose, cough, sore throat; This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.
Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Very Rare Drug Side Effects no data available
Drug Side Effects Symptoms no data available
How to Store the Medicine
How to Store the Medicine Store in a cool and dry place.

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